The brothers Eutropius and Cleonicus, and Basiliscus the nephew of the Great Martyr Theodore of Tyre, were comrades. After the martyr’s death of Saint Theodore, they wound up in prison and by their preaching brought to the Christian faith many of the pagans located in prison with them.

When he tortured Saint Theodore, Publius perished shamefully, struck down by Divine wrath. Asclepiodotos was chosen governor of Pontine Amasia, and did not bend from the fierceness of his predecessor. Knowing the comrades of the martyr Theodore of Tyre were still all in prison, the governor commanded that they be brought to him. Saints Eutropius, Cleonicus and Basiliscus thus firmly confessed their faith in Christ in front of this new governor. They were mercilessly beaten, such that their bodies became entirely bruised. At the time of torture Saint Eutropius prayed loudly to the Saviour: “Grant us, O Lord, to endure the making of these wounds for the sake of the crown of martyrdom, and come in help to us, like as Thou camest to Thy servant Theodore.” In answer to this prayer of the saint, there appeared to the martyrs the Lord Himself with Angels and together with them the holy Great Martyr Theodore of Tyre, saying to them: “Behold, the Saviour is come in help to you, that ye may know about life eternal.”

Soldiers and many of the people standing nearby were also granted to behold the Saviour. They began to urge Asclepiodotos to halt the tortures. Seeing that the people were distraught and ready to believe in the True God, the governor commanded the martyrs to be taken away. The governor then invited Saint Eutropius to him at supper and urged him to publicly offer sacrifice to the pagan gods, yet remain a Christian in soul.

But Eutropius refused this offer.

On the following day they brought the martyrs to a pagan temple, so as to compel them by force to offer sacrifice. Eutropius thereupon began to entreat the Saviour: “Lord, be with us, and destroy the raging of the pagans. Grant, that on this place be offered a Christian Bloodless Sacrifice unto Thee, the True God.” These last words of prayer had only just been spoken, when there began an earthquake, the walls of the temple began to collapse, and with them was smashed also the statue of the goddess Artemis. Everyone fled from the temple so as not to be crushed amidst the rubble. Amidst the noise of the earthquake was heard a voice from on high: “Your prayer is heard, and on this place shalt be built an house for Christian prayer.”

When the earthquake ended, the governor Asclepiodotos, barely just recovered from fright, gave orders to drive high wooden stakes into the ground, tie the martyrs to them and pour boiling tar over them. The saints began to pray to God, and Eutropius cried out turning to the torturers: “May the Lord turn your deed against you!” And the tar began to flow aside the bodies of the martyrs, like water with marble, scorching the torturers. Those seeing this fled in terror, but the governor in his bitterness gave orders to rend their bodies with iron hooks and to sting their wounds with mustard, mixed with salt and vinegar. The saints endured these torments with remarkable firmness.

The following night before execution the saints spent their time at prayer, and again the Lord appeared to them and strengthened them.

On the morning of 3 March, Saints Eutropius and Cleonicus were crucified, but Basiliscus was left in prison.

They executed Saint Basiliscus on 22 May in the city of Komana. They beheaded him, and threw his body into a river. But Christians found his remains and buried them in a ploughed field. Later at Komana was built a church in the name of Saint Basiliscus.